Ba programme in English Language and Literature




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Module 3: Other Perspectives in Poetry

^ Module 3: Other Perspectives in Poetry                                                36 hours 

  1.  W B Yeats : “Sailing to Byzantium” 

  2. Derek Walcott : “A Sea-Chantey’

3. Pablo Neruda : “Tonight I can Write”                 

   4. Walt Whitman : “Gods”

5. Wole Soyinka : “To My First White Hairs”  

6. Robert Kroetsch                         : “I’m Getting Old Now”              

7.  Sylvia Plath : “Tulips”

8. Jayanta Mahapatra : “Hunger”               

9. Dilip Chitre                               : “Father Returning Home

10. Ayappa Paniker : “Where are the woods, Children”

11. Gabriel Okara : “The Mystic Drum”

.

12. Vincent Buckley : “Late Tutorial”

4. CORE TEXT

C A Varghese Ed. Spring Rhythms: Poetic Selections. DC Books.


^ 5. MODEL QUESTION PAPER

(To be incorporated)


 


SYLLABI FOR CORE COURSES


COURSE 6: READING FICTION

 

^ COURSE CODE

ENCR6

TITLE OF THE COURSE

READING FICTION

SEMESTER IN WHICH THE COURSE IS TAUGHT

4

^ NO. OF CREDITS

4

NO. OF CONTACT HOURS

72

 

 

  1. Aim of the course:


                   To introduce the students to different kinds of fiction and to help them appreciate fiction.

 

  1. Objectives:


                    To develop critical thinking and imagination through long and short fiction and to familiarize students with cultural diversity through different representative samples of fiction.


^ 3. COURSE OUTLINE

Module 1: Novel 36 hours

                                                                                       

              The Great Gatsby- F Scott Fitzgerald 

                 


^ Module 2: Short Fiction 36 hours

 

1.  James Thurber : “The Night the Ghost Got in” 


      2. John Galsworthy                : “Quality”                                                                            

      3. Anton Chekhov               : “The Bet”


      4. Somerset Maugham     : “The Verger”

  

      5. Guy de Maupassant : “The Terror”

                                                    

      6. Mulk Raj Anand            : “The Gold Watch”                                             

                                                                                               

7. D H Lawrence                 : “The Rocking Horse Winner"  

                                        

8. Karel Capek : “The Last Judgment”


9. George Louis Borges : “The Shape of the Sword”

10. Chinua Achebe : “The Sacrificial Egg”


11. Nadine Godimer : “A Watcher of the Dead”


12. V S Naipaul : “Love, Love, Love Alone”

 

4. CORE TEXT

Dr Leesa Sadasivan Ed. Tales to Remember. OUP


^ 6. MODEL QUESTION PAPER

(To be incorporated later)


Syllabi for Core Courses


Course 7: Reading Drama


Course Code

ENCR 7



Title of the course

^ READING DRAMA



Semester in which the course is to be taught

5



No. of credits

4



No. of contact hours

108



 


  1. Aim of the course:

 

     To develop in the students a taste for reading drama with practical knowledge of theatrical performances.      

              

 

  1. Objectives:


     On completion of the course, the students should be familiar with the plays of master-dramatists and will have developed the ability to appreciate and evaluate various types of plays.


 

^ 3. COURSE OUTLINE


Module 1


Macbeth - William Shakespeare (72 hours) 


Module 2 - One Act Plays (36 hours)



  1. “The Swan Song” – Anton Chekhov

  2. “How he Lied to her Husband” – George Bernard Shaw

  3. “Before Breakfast” – Eugene O’Neil

  4. “A Sunny Morning” – Serafin and Joaquin Alvarez Quintero

  5. “Matsyagandhi” – M. Sajitha

  6. “The Trick” - Erisa Kironde



4. CORE TEXT

Dr K Sujatha Ed. On the Stage: One-Act Plays. Orient BlackSwan.


^ 6. MODEL QUESTION PAPER

(To be incorporated)


SYLLABI FOR CORE COURSES


Course 8: LANGUAGE AND LINGUISTICS


Course Code

ENCR 8


Title of the course

^ LANGUAGE AND LINGUISTICS


Semester in which the course

is to be taught

5


No. of credits

4


No. of contact hours

90




^ 1. Aim of the course


The course studies language and what it consists of. This is done through an examination of the internal organization of sound systems, words and sentences. The students of linguistics begin by learning how to analyse languages, their sounds (phonetics and phonology), their ways of forming words (morphology), their sentence structures (syntax), and their systems of expressing meaning (semantics).


^ 2. Objectives Of The Course


  • To lead to a greater understanding of the human communicative action through an objective study of language.

  • To familiarize students with the key concepts of linguistics and develop awareness of the latest trends in language study.

  • To help students move towards better and intelligible pronunciation and to improve the general standard of pronunciation in everyday conversation.




^ 3. Course Outline


Module I – Language and Linguistics (36 hours)


a) What is Language? - Arbitrariness – Interchangeability – Cultural transmission – Dialect – Sociolect – Idiolect - Register – Pidgin – Creole

b) What is Linguistics? - Traditional grammar and linguistics - Synchronic and

diachronic linguistics – Evolution of the study of linguistics – Major linguists -

Basic concepts in linguistics - Langue – Parole – Language as a system of

signs – Signifier and signified - Competence - Performance


c) Branches of linguistics: Phonology - Morphology: Morphemes and allomorphs – Lexical/Content Words - Functional/Structural Words - Simple, complex, compound Words - Word Formation - Inflexion - Affixation - Parts of Speech - Word Order - Phrase - Clause - Syntax: PS Grammar – Transformational Generative Grammar - Basic concepts in Semantics - Applied linguistics


^ Module II – Phonetics (54 hours )


a) Air stream Mechanism - Organs of speech - Function of vocal cords – Soft palate action – Active and passive articulators


c) R P and G I E – Uniformity and Intelligibility – Mother tongue influence - Cardinal vowels – Vowels in R P - Diphthongs – Triphthongs - Consonants – Phonemes – Allophones

d) Suprasegmentals - Syllable - Stress and Rhythm – Weak forms and Strong forms – Sentence stress - Tone groups - Basic intonation - Juncture - Elision – Assimilation


^ 4. Reading List

for module i

Krishnaswamy and Sivaraman: An Introduction to Liguistics


S. K. Verma and N. Krishnaswamy. Modern Linguistics : An Introduction. New Delhi: OUP, 1989.


H.A.Gleason. Linguistics and English Grammar. New York: Holt, Rinehart &. Winston, Inc., 1965.


H.A.Gleason. Linguistics and English Grammar. New York: Holt, Rinehart &. Winston, Inc., 1965.


For module ii


Daniel Jones. The Pronunciation of English. New Delhi: Blackie and Sons,1976.


A.C Gimson. An Introduction to the Pronunciation of English. London: Methuen, 1980.


J. D. O’Conner. Better English Pronunciation. New Delhi: CUP, 2008.


T. Balasubramaniam. A Textbook of English Phonetics for Indian Students. New Delhi: Macmillan, 1981.


T. Balasubramaniam. English Phonetics for Indian Students : A Workbook. New Delhi: Macmillan, 1992.


5. Model Question Paper (To be prepared )


^ SYLLABI FOR CORE COURSES


Course 9: LITERARY CRITICISM: THEORY AND PRACTICE


Course Code

ENCR 9


Title of the course

literary criticism: theory and practice


Semester in which the course

is to be taught

5


No. of credits

4


No. of contact hours

90



^ 1. Aim of the course


1 To familiarize the students with some of the key literary terms.

 2 To introduce the various streams in literary criticism

 3 To make them aware of the interdisciplinary nature of literary criticism

 4 To develop the skills for appreciating literature


^ 2. Objectives Of The Course


 At the end of the course the student


  • Gets the feeling that every reader including himself/herself is a critic.

  • Becomes able to differentiate between judgment and appreciation.

  • Gets in touch with various movements and schools of thought.

  • Comes to praxis from theory.

  • Develops an interdisciplinary approach.



^ 3. Course Outline


module I (18 hours)


  1. Figures of Speech: Metaphor, Synecdoche, Irony

 

  1. Movements:  Neo- classicism – Humanism - Magic realism – Symbolism - Russian Formalism - Absurd School – Modernism – Structuralism - Post structuralism - Post modernism - Deconstruction - Psychoanalytic  criticism.

 

  1. Concepts: Intentional Fallacy - Affective Fallacy - Negative Capability – Myth – Archetype – Semiotics – Reader-response criticism.

 


^ CORE READING


Abrams, M.H. A Glossary of LiteraryTerms. VII Edn. New Delhi:Thomson Heinle, 1999.


module II classical criticism (18 hours)


Plato – Theory of Imitation (Mimesis)

Aristotle – Romanticism and Classicism

 

core text

 

M.S. Nagarajan.  English Literary Criticism and Theory. Hyderabad: Orient Blackswan, 2008. Chapter I Classical Criticism


module III indian aesthetics (18 hours)


Major  Streams  of  Indian  Aesthetics - Theory  of  Rasa - Rasa  and  Catharsis


core reading


V. S. Sethuraman. Ed. Indian Aesthetics. Ch. 3 “Highways of Literary Criticism   in Sanskrit” by Kuppuswami Sastri. Ch. 13 “Rasa as Aesthetic Experience” by Mohan Thampi.


 

module IV (18 hours)


Romantic and Victorian Criticism - Twentieth Century criticism


core reading


M.S. Nagarajan. English Literary Criticism and Theory. Hyderabad: Orient Blackswan, 2008; Chapter IV and V.


module V (18 hours)


appreciation of literature (practical criticism)

 

In this module, critical analysis of short poems and prose passages are to be done by students. The students may be asked to analyse pieces in terms of theme, diction, tone, figures of speech, imagery, etc.  Theoretical approaches may be avoided.


General (Background) Reading

  1. Oxford Dictionary of Literary Terms

  2. Peck John et al. Literary Terms and Criticism, New Delhi: Macmillan,1998.

 

  1. Prasad, B. An Introduction  to English Criticism. New Delhi: Macmillan. 1965.

  2. Barry, Peter. Beginning Theory . Manchester and NY: Manchester Uty. Press, 1995.

  3. Bertens , Hans. Literary Theory: The Basics. London: Routledge, 2001.



^ SYLLABI FOR CORE COURSES


Course 10: POSTCOLONIAL LITERATURES



Course Code

ENCR10


Title of the course

^ POSTCOLONIAL LITERATURES


Semester in which the course is to be taught

5


No. of credits

4


No. of contact hours

90

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