Gce chemistry b (Salters)




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TitleGce chemistry b (Salters)
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Date conversion11.07.2012
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Sourcehttp://www.ocr.org.uk/download/sm/ocr_32223_sm_gce_unit_f334_scheme_word.doc
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^ Suggested teaching time

2 hours

Topic

Story SS 1 What is steel?


Lesson

^ Suggested teaching and homework activities

Non-Salters resources

Specification Statements & Points to note

(1)

    This extra lesson should only be used if time allows, otherwise the activity should be omitted, the revision and plan should then be set as homework.

    • Students should take note of ^ STORY SS1 p57-58 ‘What is steel?’ before carrying out ACT SS1.1 ‘How much copper is there in brass?’ (This should otherwise be done as a revision activity at some stage)

    • Set a selection of end of section Qs from IDEAS 1.1, 1.2, 1.3.

    • Students should read ACT SS1.2 ‘How much manganese is there in a nail?’ and use the box on the second page to help write a plan for step 7. Refer them to IDEAS Appendix 1 p372 ‘Using a colorimeter’ for help.

    Candidates should be able to:

    • Use the concept of amount of substance to perform calculations involving: molecular formulae, masses of reagents, volumes of solutions of known concentrations

    • Write and interpret balanced equations

    • Apply scientific knowledge and processes to unfamiliar situations

2

  • Begin with a class discussion about how to carry out the colorimetry stage of SS1.2. Summarise the main steps.

  • Students carry out and complete SS1.2 ‘How much manganese is there in a nail?’ In order to answer Q5, they should be encouraged to read IDEAS 6.7 p153-154 ‘Where does colour come from?’





    Candidates should be able to:

  • Describe and explain a simple colorimeter, and use colorimetric measurements to determine the concentration of a coloured solution:

  1. choose suitable filter/set wavelength,

  2. make up standard solutions of coloured solution,

  3. zero colorimeter with tube of water/solvent,

  4. measure absorbance of standard solutions,

  5. plot calibration curve,

  6. measure absorbance of unknown,

  7. read off concentration from calibration curve

  • Explain and evaluate the methodology and results of investigative activities

  • Recall that the ions of transition metals in solution are often coloured and explain that this is because they absorb in specific parts of the visible spectrum and transmit the complementary frequencies (no explanation in terms of energy levels is required in this unit)

^ Suggested teaching time

3 hours

Topic

Story SS 2 From iron to steel

Story SS 4 Recycling steel


Lesson

Suggested teaching and homework activities

^ Non-Salters resources

Specification Statements & Points to note

3 + 4

  • Students should complete ACT SS2 ‘How much iron is there in dried thyme?

  • They should complete a full write up of this practical including the Qs.

  • Students struggling with the concepts in this activity should be referred back to IDEAS 9.1 ‘Oxidation and reduction’ and IDEAS 1.5 ‘Concentrations of solutions’. Also IDEAS 3.1 p 42 Table 3 – formulae of common ions.

  • All students should attempt IDEAS 9.1 end of section Qs 6-9.

  • The concepts behind redox titrations and their calculations are often found difficult by students. The web site: http://www.docbrown.info/page07/SSquestions/redox_vol_calcs1.htm

has lots of examples including full worked answers for both acid-base and redox titrations. The site includes structured and non-structured tasks.






  • http://www.chemsheets.co.uk/A2513.doc non-structured redox calculations

  • A useful alternative is SS1.2 ‘A redox titration’ if you have access to the Heinemann Support Pack 2nd Edition

  • Activity 30 ‘Oxidation numbers’ from Chemistry for the gifted and talented by Tim Jolliff, published by the RSC is a stretching but useful extension of oxidation numbers, equations and calculations



    Candidates should be able to:

  • Recall and explain the procedure for carrying out a redox titration involving manganate(VII) ions

  • Use the concept of amount of substance to perform calculations involving: masses of reagents, volumes of solutions of known concentrations

  • Given the necessary information, describe and explain procedures for redox titrations and carry out non-structured calculations based on the results

  • Interpret balanced equations, including ionic, given the necessary information

  • Explain and evaluate the methodology and results of investigative activities

  • Given the necessary information, describe redox reactions of d-block elements (and main group elements) in terms of electron transfer: assigning oxidation states, use systematic nomenclature to name and interpret the names of inorganic compounds [i.e. copper(II) sulfide, lead(II) nitrate(V), potassium manganate(VII)

  • Recall the names and formulae of NO3, SO42, CO32, OH, NH4+, HCO3; write formulae for compounds formed between these ions and other given anions and cations




Lesson

Suggested teaching and homework activities

Non-Salters resources

^ Specification Statements & Points to note

5 + (6)

The extra lesson may be needed here depending on how much time is spent revising GCSE and AS concepts.

  • Show students the RSC iron and steel video, accessible from: http://www.rsc.org/education/teachers/learnnet/alchemy/index2.htm

  • Give students an enlarged (A3 would be good) copy of Fig.2 (STORY p 61). They should then label this with all the relevant equations from ^ STORY SS2 p59-64 ‘From iron to steel’. They should assign oxidation states to the elements in the equations and indicate in each equation what has been oxidised and what has been reduced. They should also label their diagram with any other important chemical information such as reaction types and exothermic/endothermic.




  • To consolidate their learning, they should then complete ASS 2 (STORY p61), ASS 3 (STORY p62) and ASS 4 (STORY p63).

  • ^ STORY SS2 p60 ‘Extraction of metals- general principles’ is largely revision from core GCSE but is worth touching on briefly here.

  • Atomic emission spectroscopy is revised in a later module so there is no need to revise IDEAS 6.1 in detail here. A quick read to aid understanding of ^ STORY SS2 p62 ‘Measuring the composition’ is all that is needed.

  • Homework for this lesson should be to make their own notes on STORY SS2 p64-65 ‘Can steel making be improved?’ and STORY SS4 p69-70 ‘Recycling steel’ using the specification statements as a guide.

  • Extension activities here could include SS2.1 ‘Why is blast furnace iron so impure’, SS2.2 ‘What changes occur during steel making?’ and SS2.3 ‘Getting the heat balance right’ if you have access to the Heinemann Support Pack 2nd Edition



    Candidates should be able to:

  • Given the necessary information, explain the chemical processes occurring during the extraction and purification of metals from their ores

  • Write and interpret balanced equations, including ionic, given the necessary information

  • Given the necessary information, describe redox reactions of d-block elements (and main group elements) in terms of electron transfer: assigning oxidation states, recognising the oxidising and reducing agents, defining oxidation and reduction in terms of loss and gain of electrons

  • Describe and explain the issues involved in the recycling of iron and steel:
    all steel packaging except aerosols can be recycled, cleaning by incineration,
    ease of sorting using magnetic properties,
    composition of new steel easily adjusted,
    scrap is used to adjust temperature of furnace




^ Suggested teaching time

4 hours

Topic

Story SS 3 Steel for a purpose


Lesson

^ Suggested teaching and homework activities

Non-Salters resources

Specification Statements & Points to note

7

  • Briefly review the material from SS2 and SS4.

  • Introduce ^ STORY SS3 p65 ‘Steel for a purpose’. Explain that rusting is as a result of redox reactions.

  • Give students 2 or 3 examples of oxidation and reduction half equations to complete before working through IDEAS 9.2 p198-200 ‘Redox reactions’ ‘Combining half equations’ and ‘Electrochemical cells’. Question 2 from the end of section Qs could be used for the half equations and full equations.

  • A useful introductory practical is SS3.1 ‘A simple redox reaction’ if you have access to the Heinemann Support Pack 2nd Edition. If not it would be worth demonstrating a simple reaction such as the reaction of copper with silver nitrate solution. Link the outcomes to IDEAS 9.2.

  • Students now carry out ACT SS3.1 ‘Simple electrochemical cells’.

  • For homework, they should attempt IDEAS end of section Q1 and use IDEAS 9.2 p198-205 ‘Redox reactions and electrode potentials’ to try to explain the results of ACT SS3.1.




    Candidates should be able to:

  • Write and interpret balanced equations, including ionic, given the necessary information

  • Given the necessary information, describe redox reactions of d-block elements (and main group elements) in terms of electron transfer: assigning oxidation states, using half-equations to represent the oxidation and reduction reactions, combining half-equations to give the overall equation for the reaction, recognising the oxidising and reducing agents, defining oxidation and reduction in terms of loss and gain of electrons


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